Grading Guidelines

  • KSD Grading Guidelines During COVID Closure

    In alignment with OSPI’s priorities for continuous learning, the outlined grading and end of year reporting requirements are designed to promote compassion, communication, and common sense.

    OSPI also provides the following lens for student learning and grading:

    “Continuous learning requires educators to think about the enduring concepts of a content; learning being for learning’s sake, without the expectation to cover an entire content or subject area; developmentally appropriate tasks or projects that provide opportunities for students to engage meaningfully in content through different ways; and providing feedback to students in a variety of ways. Educators use student outcomes to review skills, challenge students with a related concept, and advance to the next knowledge or skill. Students shall be introduced to concepts and explore content while applying their learning and self-assessing in a way that demonstrates learning and progression of grade level standards as established by Washington State Learning Standards.”[1]

    KSD Grading Expectations for all students during COVID closure:

    • Student will not fall any further behind based on their performance during COVID closure and grade will carry forward.
    • Students will be given an opportunity to engage in continuous learning to maintain or improve their mastery of essential standards.
    • Student attendance will not be a factor when determining student grades (RCW 28A.600.030).
    • Teachers will provide ongoing feedback for all students.
    • Teachers will complete the designated reporting option for all students (and any other reporting requirements for students with IEPs or 504s).
    • District will include a designation on all reporting that this is the COVID grade.
    • Principals and district will plan for how this information will impact master scheduling activities.
    • Principals will prepare staff for aligning grading and assessment practices for end of year reporting.
    • Districts will develop a plan to allow students to meet standards.
    • District will develop a plan to determine how to gather information about which specific standards students need another opportunity to learn and work with schools to support students getting on track for the 20-21SY.

    The following information is organized by level and subsections for each level.

    • Elementary
    • Middle School
    • High School
    • iGrad
    • Special Education Students (applicable to all levels)
    • Newly Enrolled Students

Elementary

  • Grading Scale: English Language Arts & Math Only

    Students will not earn grades lower than the grade they had at the time of school closure on March 12And all students will have the opportunity to improve their grade.

    Rating of 4: Superior Performance at/above Grade Level Standard

    • The teacher was able to determine superior performance with learning standards for the subject based on the skill development of the student before closure (March 12) and after closure (March 16 - June 19).

    Rating of 3: At Grade Level Standard

    • The teacher was able to determine proficiency of the learning standards for the subject based on the skill development of the student before closure (March 12) and after closure (March 16 - June 19).

    Rating of 2: Approaching Grade Level Standard

    • The teacher was able to determine level of proficiency of the learning standards for the subject based on the skill development of the student during the first semester. This designation is used to inform teachers in the upcoming school year that there are areas in need of support.

    End of Year Communication to Students & Families

    Modified “Student Goal Setting Form” which will include the following fields (and any fields currently included on the Student Goal Setting Form):

    • Student name
    • School name
    • Teacher name
    • Grade year
    • Current grade level
    • Special support services (IE, EL, Highly Capable)
    • NEW: End of Year Rating for ELA and Math (see grade scale)
    • Assessment information including fall and winter IRLA and iReady scores for reading and math, current performance level, and end of year goal
    • NEW: Comment sections for teachers to input information for Reading, Writing, and Math

    OSPI Guidance on Retention

    Students in grades K–8 will be challenged to demonstrate effort and success in learning standards established by their teachers. Students will move on to the next grade, unless by mutual agreement between parents/guardians and teachers they agree to repeat a grade or a portion of learning missed. Districts will retain complete decision-making on middle school grading practices for students not taking high school credit-bearing courses.[1]

    Please note, per KSD Board Policy 2421, “Retention should only be considered after other alternatives have been tried and documented. The decision to retain a student should be based upon the recommendation of a school team and the parents after considering research and best practice, the student’s age, extenuating circumstances, and special program needs, and shall be at the discretion of the school principal.”

    Please refer to KSD’s current Board Policy, Student Promotion, Retention, Acceleration, and Class Standing, 2421.

Middle School

  • Grading Scale

    Students will not earn grades lower than the grade they had at the time of school closure on March 12And all students will have the opportunity to improve their grade.

    Proficient or On Target

    • The teacher was able to determine proficiency of the learning standards for the course based on the skill development of the student before closure (March 12) and after closure (March 16 - June 19).

    Developing or Approaching or Emerging

    • The teacher was able to determine level of proficiency of the learning standards for the course based on the skill development of the student during the first semester. This designation is used to inform teachers in the upcoming school year that there are areas in need of support.

    Courses for High School Credit

    Apply high school grading requirements. Examples of those courses include:

    • Algebra 1-2
    • Geometry 1-2
    • Algebra 3-4
    • Physical Education 9
    • Applications in the Arts I
    • Health & Fitness 8 I-II
    • Computer Essentials

    End of Year Communication to Students & Families

    Students will receive a report card.

    OSPI Guidance on Retention

    Students in grades K–8 will be challenged to demonstrate effort and success in learning standards established by their teachers. Students will move on to the next grade, unless by mutual agreement between parents/guardians and teachers they agree to repeat a grade or a portion of learning missed. Districts will retain complete decision-making on middle school grading practices for students not taking high school credit-bearing courses.[1]

High School

  • Grading Scale for All High School Courses

    Students will not earn grades lower than the grade they had at the time of school closure on March 12And all students will have the opportunity to improve their grade.

    A Rating

    • Including coursework and assessments completed prior to school closure and majority of coursework completed during closure (May 4 – June 15).

    B Rating

    • Including coursework and assessments completed prior to school closure and at least half of coursework completed during closure (May 4 – June 15).

    C Rating

    • Including coursework and assessments completed prior to school closure and some of coursework completed during closure (May 4 – June 15) or has most coursework excused due to personal circumstances shared with the teacher.

    Incomplete Rating

    • The teacher was not able to determine proficiency of the learning standards for the course, which could be attributed to a variety of reasons. Additional considerations for assigning an “Incomplete” is provided below.

    Additional Requirements Aligned to OSPI Guidance

    Incomplete (per OSPI): Students assigned an ‘Incomplete’ for a course will be given opportunities to reengage in the learning standards based on local school district decisions.

    • An ‘Incomplete’ communicates that a teacher was not able to determine proficiency of the learning standards for the course, which could be attributed to a variety of reasons.
    • In order to assign an ‘Incomplete’ to a student, a teacher must be able to identify the specific standard the student was unable to meet and the steps to demonstrate meeting the standard. [1]
    • WAC 392-901-030: Local education agencies must provide parents an opportunity to request an incomplete for students who could not engage in continuous learning after March 17, 2020.

    Making Up Grades

    • The student has an opportunity to engage in late work or work from third quarter that was due prior to the closure (March 12) during a “time bound period” (p. 12). This time bound period is to be determined by the teacher and clearly communicated to students and families. OSPI’s example of a time period is 2-3weeks (p. 12). Teachers may extend beyond this expectation, but not below it. We recommend that teachers teaching the same course be consistent in this time expectation and plans should be shared with school administrators to confirm alignment.
    • Each student will be provided the opportunity to engage, learn and receive feedback to do “grade improvement” (p.12) including those who were failing on March 12.[2]
    • For students with baseline grades of “F” if the student does not engage or cannot “equitably engage” (p. iii, 2D) then the student will receive an “Incomplete”
    • By graduation, students should be given multiple opportunities to resolve the ‘Incomplete.’ If this does not happen, then existing credit flexibility may be used if it is appropriate for the missed credit(s).[3]
    • Some shared strategies and future considerations include:
      • Encourage teachers to keep an archive of assignments given to students and the associated standards as support for course completion with credit after receiving an ‘Incomplete’ during school facility closures.
      • Use a diagnostic tool for student placement for next year for students who may be transferring in from another state or district.
      • Build competency-based courses.
      • Build credit retrieval courses, including virtual learning options, into the master schedule.
      • Build interventions and additional or repeated support in the master schedule.
      • Create opportunities for credit retrieval through independent study.
      • Backfill the ‘Incomplete’ grade with the letter grade obtained in the next course taken in that subject area.
      • Provide summer school options as appropriate. [4]

    Do No Harm

    • An ‘Incomplete’ cannot affect a student’s GPA and a subsequent attempt and grade of a course will replace that ‘I’.
    • The sending school district must communicate what the student needs in order to achieve a grade and for the student to successfully resolve the ‘Incomplete.’[5]

    End of Year Communication to Students & Families

    Students will receive a report card.

iGrad

  • iGrad Will Continue with Current Grading Policies

    • All “live” courses taught by staff or partners have to account for high mobility and have backup packets/plans for students to access to meet standards as appropriate.
    • Failure (“F’s”)is not an option. This involves multiple opportunities for redos, scaffolding content, etc.
    • There is no need to have an Incomplete (“I”) at iGrad as kids are limited to 2 courses at a time and can withdraw and reenroll and pick back up where they left off even in our onsite partnered “live” courses.
    • No Credit (“NC’s”) is not an option.

    Grading Scale

    • A (93-100)
    • A- (90-92)
    • B+ (88-89)
    • B (82-87)
    • B - (80-81)
    • C+ (78-79)
    • C (72-77)
    • C- (70-71)
    • D+ (67-69)
    • D (60-66): Students have to demonstrate understanding of standards with a minimum D level.
    • W (Withdrawn): A student that withdraws before completing  their course gets a W.
    • P (Pass): Students who are SE and ELL can earn P’s if they demonstrate performance expectations in agreement with their educational plans. Any student who receive competency-based credit retrieval credits earns a P.

Special Education Students (Applicable to all Levels)

  • Please reference the following guidance from OSPIs FAQ on Student Learning and Grading:

    "Q-7: How are Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) impacted by OSPI’s grading guidance, particularly for IEPs that specify a ‘Pass/Fail’ grading system?

    Districts and families may retain the grading practice that was established in the IEP prior to the closure. However, no failing grades are permitted for this term. OSPI’s Special Education Continuous Learning Plan (model form 16b) is a resource for situations in which an existing IEP outlines ‘Pass/Fail.’ Considering the recent OSPI guidance on grading, a failing grade should not be used for spring 2020. If it seems that a student with IEP grading accommodations or modifications may not pass the course, the district should discuss OSPI’s grading guidance with the student and family. A similar process should be used for students with 504 Plans that include grading accommodations or modifications"

Newly Enrolled Students

  • Follow our current district protocols for newly enrolled students which includes the following:

    • Carry forward grades from their previous schools (may require additional review of information from CEDARS).
    • If newly enrolled students were not attending school or had no grades from a previous school will likely need to give an “I” or incomplete at the high school level. 

Sources

Last Modified on May 4, 2020