May 9, 2019: Kentlake High School

  • About the Event

    The following questions were recorded by Karen and Debbie at the May 9, 2019, Community Conversation with the School Board held at Kentlake High School. Three people attended this event. 

    The Board worked with Team KSD for answers and made them available on May 22, 2019. 

    Questions

    1. Why are we putting kindergartners on computers? Are we going to limit their access? Brain research says screen time has an effect on brain development. Are we paying attention to that? Are the elementary students going to take home their laptops? Will we get time cards showing how much screen time the littlest students get during the day?

    The state requires every student be assessed at least once in kindergarten (WAKIDS), 3rd – 8th grades ELA and math (SBA), and once in high school for ELA, math, and science (SBA). The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a transition process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience and connect the key adults in a child’s life. Teachers complete a performance rubric for each kindergartner. Students do not engage with technology for this assessment. WAKIDS has nothing to do with Kent’s commitment to 1:1 devices.

    Providing a device for every student has been a commitment of Kent school District since 2007-2008.

    During each of these presentations to the Board, the purpose of 1:1 has been to encourage and expand learning anywhere options for students. The purpose and commitment to 1:1 has not changed since the original 2006-07 plan. By a narrow margin, the taxpayers confirmed the commitment by reauthorizing the tech levy.

    These devices are not a necessity. Technology in the form of a 1:1 device for each student enhances the instruction provided by teachers and is a supplement to that instruction. It can also be a cost-saving tool when implemented appropriately. Additionally, the devices are used for state assessments and formative assessments.

    Time cards are not sent home to parents/guardians.

    2. Is KSD going to online high schools as the standard (completely) in order for students to get their 24 credits? Is KSD still using the Internet Academy for online classes?

    No, KSD is not changing all high schools to an online-only model to meet Core 24 requirements. In 2015, the Washington State Board of Education implemented the Career- and College-Ready Graduation Requirements (CCRGR). Reflected in RCW 28A.230.090, the number of credits required for graduation increased statewide to 24 for the classes of 2019 and beyond.

    School districts were given an opportunity to receive an implementation waiver for up to two years through the class of 2020. Kent School District (KSD) received a waiver from the State Board of Education on August 9, 2018. This allows the district to take additional time to determine the appropriate district strategy for ensuring that every student has the opportunity to achieve the 24-credit requirement.

    In March 2019, the Kent School Board was presented with information about district administration’s plan to convene a cross-functional committee to review bell schedule options that maximize the opportunity for students to achieve the 24 credits.

    Early this spring, KSD recruited volunteers who are willing to dedicate approximately 10 hours a month (including in-person meetings and pre-reading) to the work of helping determine the KSD strategy for helping our students achieve the Career- and College-Ready Graduation Requirements. This Core 24 Committee made up of students, parents, staff, and community members from across our district will begin meeting this month.

    Kent Virtual High School is pen district-wide to all high school students and to out of district high school students. This program operates out of KPA and is designed to serve students 9th through 12th grade wanting the ability to access their coursework anytime, anywhere, and anyplace.

    3. Is KSD not reducing K-3 class sizes and taking the $4 million loss from the state? Why?  

    1:17 K-3 class size is determined at a districtwide level by dividing the total number of students in K-3 with the total K-3 teacher FTE. The teacher FTE that can be factored into that equation is dictated by WAC 392-140-932 and includes not only elementary classroom teachers in grades k-3, but also portions of FTE in pe, music, Special education, Hi-Cap, ELL, and others. Therefore, classrooms can expect to have more than 17 students when the districtwide 1:17 ratio is met. KSD is in the process of ensuring all qualifying teacher FTE has been factored and is reviewing the student enrollment projections to determine exactly how many teachers would need to be hired to meet the 1:17 ratio. 

    4. Has anyone from Finance told the board how much implementing 1:17 would cost?  

    Information has been provided in public work sessions about the cost of providing additional teachers to meet the 1:17 ratio. 

    5. How does this affect the KEA contract? 

    The 1:17 ratio is well below the class size ratios set in the KEA contract. KSD’s ability to meet the 1:17 ratio has no impact on the KEA contract. 

    6. Why don’t we cut some elective offerings so more students would choose music? 

    Graduation requirements, authorized courses, and course descriptions, together with information to help students make wise choices for their high school education and future are contained in the Kent School District High School Course Catalog. Students and Families should please contact the counseling office of the appropriate high school if there are questions that do not seem to be answered in the resources and information provided through the course catalog. 

    7. Have any board members been in elementary music and PE classes? Are they doubling up groups of students in these classes? 

    The Board of Directors can each speak to their experience in our schools. Certificated classroom allocations are driven by enrollment counts, using the class size language in the Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA). 

    8. Do we have a policy that says who researches curriculum and for how long? Has a math specialist looked at Ready Math? 

    Curriculum Development and Adoption of Instructional Materials is KSD Policy 2020 and Procedure 2020. Math, English Language Learner, and Special Education specialists and teachers reviewed the materials using components of the Instructional Materials Evaluation Tool (IMET), Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Products (EQuIP) rubric, and the anti-bias rubric developed by OSPI. 

    9. Was it presented to the community for preview? When (dates, please)? By whom? 

    The Curriculum and Instruction team invited students, staff, family and community members through calendar website, district news, emails via event flyers, app notifications, and district social media to provide input on K-5 math curriculum options. There were two opportunities to review the curriculum and provide your feedback to the curriculum review team on March 28 from 5:30-8:00 p.m. and on March 30 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. An RSVP was not required to attend.  
    Additionally, an open curriculum review session was set up for members of the Kent Area Council PTSA during their April General Membership Meeting. 

    10. Do we have any evidence from outside the company about the effectiveness of this program?  

    The adoption of Ready Classroom curriculum was approved by the Kent School Board at the May 8, 2019 regular board meeting.  
    References to external research on the Ready Instruction include (not limited to): EdReports, Efficacy Research for Ready Mathematics and ESSA conducted by HumRRO. 

    11. Why wasn’t the board given a presentation on Ready Math before they were asked to approve it? 

    Per Board Policy 2020 “The responsibility for examining, evaluating, and selecting all materials is delegated to the professional staff with regular review by an appropriate committee of the district. The superintendent will establish procedures for review and adoption of instructional materials.” 

    12. Are students going to be working on it at home? 

    Elements of the curriculum may be able access elements of the curriculum and related learning supports at home, but it will not be a requirement.  

    13. Why is making iGrad smaller a good idea?  

    We shared first with iGrad staff then with the community in March 2019, iGrad will remain in its current location in the 2019-20 school year, but it will utilize only one storefront based on student need. 

    14. iGrad students don’t get lunch; what is happening to the free/reduced lunch reimbursement that iGrad students bring in? Will the state cover food for iGrad students? 

    We Participate in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast programs sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Breakfast and lunch are available at no cost or at a reduced price for qualifying students. 

    Students who were on the program in the previous school year must submit an application within 30 days of the start of the new school year to avoid a gap in benefits, and must reapply each school year

    More information is available on our website.  

    15. How much money is coming in from iGrad’s community partners? Where does it go?   

     This was information was recently shared at a Board Work session on February 6, 2019. The information shared with the Board of Directors is also available on BoardDocs.  

    16. Are we accounting for the special education dollars that iGrad students bring in as part of the budget for iGrad? 

    Allocations from our state are calculated on an annual per pupil percentage over the course of the school year districtwide. This FTE count for all students, and student groups, does include our academy students including those enrolled in iGrad. 

    17. How much money has accepting students from other districts “saved” us?  

    We receive the same per pupil amount for transfer students as students who live in our district.  

    18. Why was the district website changed so we can’t see the list of all staff in order to find where they are? 

    The Kent School District Administration Center Staff Directory is available through Meet Team KSD > Staff Directory or by using the "Directory" icon on the right side of the homepage and the bottom of every webpage.  

    School staff directories are available on each school website through Our School > Meet Our Team or by using the "Directory" icon on the right side of the homepage and the bottom of every webpage. 

    19. Where is the IE staff? Are they spread out all over the district? Why?  

    Currently, over 3,500 children and young adults receive special education services in Kent School District. Once a child or young adult is identified as eligible for special education services, the school district provides a free and appropriate public education emphasizing special education and related services designed to meet the student’s unique needs. 

    Creating appropriate education opportunities to accommodate all students requires that we have inclusive education certificated staff members and non-certificated staff members, both school-based and located in the central office. Organizationally, the Inclusive Education team is part of our Teaching and Learning Community.  

May 9, 2019: Kentwood High School

  • About the Event

    The following questions were recorded by Maya Vengadasalam and Austin Freeman at the May 9, 2019, Community Conversation with the School Board held at Kentwood High School. More than sixty students and twenty adults attended this event. 

    The Board worked with Team KSD for answers and made them available on May 22, 2019. 

    Questions

    1. If no forms were provided, how can a class fill up? How can we say that we did not have enough students to fill a class if forms were not provided? 

    Students who are interested in KSD Music programs are encouraged to register for these courses during the registration period.

    2. How are we supporting grants for music?

    Currently, the Kent School District does not have any districtwide grants for Music. We have developed a partnership with Music4Life and the Music4Life booster club is working to raise money to repair the instruments that are donated to our district in order to create greater access to instruments. As opportunities for external funding that are appropriate for the Kent School District, we will continue to pursue sources.

    3. A choir leader spoke about adjacent schools which are expanding their music programs. How are we doing compared to the rest?

    We will need additional time to reach out and connect with our adjacent districts to provide an appropriate response to this question. Our team did not attend the meeting, but encourage the teacher referenced in this question to contact our office to hear more about his or her learning from other districts.

    4. Why are we not calling our actions cuts to teachers when we promised that levy will fund music?

    The Replacement Educational Programs and Operations Levy passed in February 2018 by our voters is a two-year replacement levy providing nearly 20 percent of the district’s overall budget. It funds approximately one in five of all employees and bridges the gap between state funding and community expectations. This levy provides support for athletics, music and drama programs, transportation services, and safety improvements.

    Student Support (Funds 1 in 5 of our employees)

    • Nurses: The state provides funding for 4.5 FTE (full time equivalent) and KSD employs a total of 22.4 FTE nurses to meet the individual health needs of the students and the needs of those students who need special care.
    • Safety and Security Personnel: The state provides funding for 5 FTE and KSD employs 14.23 FTE to meet the safety and security needs of our students and staff at our 42 school sites.
    • School counselors, social workers and school psychologists: The state provides funding for 57.9 FTE and KSD employs 28 school psychologists, 31 secondary and 13 elementary counselors along with 5 social workers.  Nearly 20 more FTE above the state allocation formula, to meet to meet the unique social emotional and counseling needs of our 27,000 students.

    Academic Programs & Classroom Supports

    • Certificated and classified staff for Special Education and Highly Capable programs
    • Paraeducators
    • Professional development for teachers including professional learning days, training, and workshops
    • Substitute teachers
    • Curriculum materials and training
    • Reduced class sizes

    Activities, Athletics & Enrichment

    • Advanced Placement (AP) Classes
    • International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program
    • All extracurricular activities
    • Sports
    • Athletic directors
    • Coaches

    Operations

    • Transportation
    • Substitute classified staff
    • Maintenance staff
    • Custodians

    Opportunities

    • High school schedules that create opportunities for acceleration, exploration, and remediation
    • Music programming at the elementary schools
    • Increased counselors and support
    • Expanded Early Learning programs

    Levy Funding

    Overall funding is $94 million total over two years:

    • 2019: $44 million
    • 2020: $50 million

    5. How do we expect to have enrollment go up if classes are not offered?

    Please reference the Kent School District Course Catalog for the range of courses available to students at each school.

    6. We have 15 percussionists now; how are they expected to stay if we cut programs?

    Please see the detailed response to the question regarding Chamber Orchestra to the programs offered based on student registration.

    7. What can we (students) do to save the programs?

    Student choice is a key driver for course offerings. Students who are interested in KSD Music programs are encouraged to register for these courses during the registration period. We appreciate the support of our current Music students who lead the demonstration assemblies at our local elementary schools to promote early exposure, access, and interest for our music programs.

    8. I voted for the levy; we were promised that the fifth-grade bands will be reinstated and that music programs will not be cut anymore. What happened?

    The Replacement Educational Programs and Operations Levy passed in February 2018 by our voters is a two-year replacement levy providing nearly 20 percent of the district’s overall budget. It funds approximately one in five of all employees and bridges the gap between state funding and community expectations. This levy provides support for athletics, music and drama programs, transportation services, and safety improvements.

    Student Support (Funds 1 in 5 of our employees)

    • Nurses: The state provides funding for 4.5 FTE (full time equivalent) and KSD employs a total of 22.4 FTE nurses to meet the individual health needs of the students and the needs of those students who need special care.
    • Safety and Security Personnel: The state provides funding for 5 FTE and KSD employs 14.23 FTE to meet the safety and security needs of our students and staff at our 42 school sites.
    • School counselors, social workers and school psychologists: The state provides funding for 57.9 FTE and KSD employs 28 school psychologists, 31 secondary and 13 elementary counselors along with 5 social workers.  Nearly 20 more FTE above the state allocation formula, to meet to meet the unique social emotional and counseling needs of our 27,000 students.

    Academic Programs & Classroom Supports

    • Certificated and classified staff for Special Education and Highly Capable programs
    • Paraeducators
    • Professional development for teachers including professional learning days, training, and workshops
    • Substitute teachers
    • Curriculum materials and training
    • Reduced class sizes

    Activities, Athletics & Enrichment

    • Advanced Placement (AP) Classes
    • International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program
    • All extracurricular activities
    • Sports
    • Athletic directors
    • Coaches

    Operations

    • Transportation
    • Substitute classified staff
    • Maintenance staff
    • Custodians

    Opportunities

    • High school schedules that create opportunities for acceleration, exploration, and remediation
    • Music programming at the elementary schools
    • Increased counselors and support
    • Expanded Early Learning programs

    Levy Funding

    Overall funding is $94 million total over two years:

    • 2019: $44 million
    • 2020: $50 million

    9. What is the future plan for music for the next 8 years? Where will we be then?

    Please reference the Board Presentation in March by Dr. Christopher White that outlines the preliminary work this year and looking ahead. We are in the process of developing a systemic plan for growing our music programs K-12.

    10. How do the permanent electives work? How do we keep music systematized such that interest and options meet the needs of students throughout their years at KSD?

    The Kent School District offers a wide variety of elective courses. The offering of any elective course in Middle and High School is based on the number of students who are interested in taking a course available in our course catalog. We are in the process of developing a systemic plan for growing our music programs K-12.

    11. Chamber orchestra is growing and yet we are facing cuts. Why?

    Each Spring after enrollment projections have been reviewed, the student transfer window has closed, secondary school registrations have been submitted, and federal programming allocations have been received, preliminary allocations are sent to principals for review with human resources. The timeline of this process is in alignment with all KSD collective bargaining agreements.

    Based on the information outlined above, the allocations for 2019-20 school year reflected a total reduction of 26.6 positions across all four comprehensive high schools, 6.2 positions across the four middle schools and 40 positions across the 28 elementary schools.

    Compare school music courses and sections from 2018-2019 to 2019-20 across high schools and middle schools. 

    12. Why aren’t the principals here with the counselors to meet with students to answer their questions?

    These are Board Community Conversations, these events were scheduled by School Board Directors Denise Daniels, Karen DeBruler, Ross Hardy, Debbie Straus, and Maya Vengadasalam because they are interested in meeting with the Kent School District (KSD) community. These events are opportunities for members of the KSD community to engage in two-way, meaningful conversation with KSD Board Members.

    13. How can we learn more about the KSD budgets?

    Each month the Budget and Finance team presents updates on our district finances to the board in open plumbic meetings. These meetings can be attended in person, or viewed via livestream, or via our district YouTube account. Supporting documents for these presentations are available on BoardDocs, the board’s website that houses all board meeting agendas, policies and procedures.

    Additionally, available on the Budget and Finance team’s webpage on the KSD website are ASB Fund Balance Reports and Financial Statements, including Newsletters, Monthly Financial Statements, Comprehensive Annual Financial Documents and other pertinent financial documents in the file library. 

    14. Why are we denying other students to transfer to our schools when enrollment is down, and why are the students who have transferred facing less program options?

    Out of district students must apply for a release from their home district into KSD and we accept based on Board policy and space availability.

    15. Chinese program was eliminated from all high schools. Can it be kept alive in any high school?

    These courses were founded in the District Master List of Courses for 2019-20 as of May 17, 2019. Students and Families should please contact the counseling office of the appropriate high school if there are questions that do not seem to be answered in the resources and information provided through the course catalog.

    • CHINESE-MANDARIN I-II - FLC001/FLC002
    • CHINESE-MANDARIN III-IV - FLC003/FLC004
    • CHINESE-MANDARIN V-VI - FLC005/FLC006
    • CHINESE-MANDARIN VII-VIII - FLC007/FLC008

    16. Why are we paying the superintendent and leadership so much money when we are facing cuts?

    In 2017-2018, KSD adopted a new leadership salary schedule that reduced the overall cost of compensation for administrators. In addition, fringe benefits were reduced, and all administrators took furlough days. The fringe benefit reduction has continued into 2018-2019 and the compensation savings continue with the adopted salary schedule.

    17. What are we doing about retention and are we adhering to what was presented to the Board by Ms. Martin? 

    The workforce retention study documents are available on BoardDocs and on May 22, 2019 at the Board of Directors meeting, the results of the Stay Interviews, Phase 2 will be shared along with action steps moving forward.

    18. Why do we continue to allow 1:1 in elementary when screen time is an issue in the earlier years? Specifically, why are we investing in iReady for assessments?

    The state requires that every student be assessed at least once in kindergarten (WAKIDS), grades 3-8 ELA and math (SBA), and once in high school for ELA, math, and science (SBA).

    Providing a device for every student has been a commitment of Kent school District since 2007-2008.

    During each of these presentations to the Board, the purpose of 1:1 has been to encourage and expanding learning anywhere options for students. The purpose and commitment to 1:1 has not changed since the original 2006-07 plan. By a narrow margin, the taxpayers confirmed the commitment by reauthorizing the tech levy.

    One to one devices are not a necessity, technology in the form of 1:1 devices for students, enhances the instruction provided by teachers and are a supplement and can be a cost-saving tool when implemented appropriately. Additionally, the devices are used for state assessments and formative assessments.

    19. What has improved in our district with our current administration?

    Each year the KSD Superintendent delivers a State of Our District presentation providing pertinent updates about our district. This year, our State of Our District presentation was delivered digitally. This new innovative, no-cost solution allows us to focus on our core business of teaching and learning while providing pertinent updates about our district to a large audience in a digital format that can be translated, accessed conveniently on various platforms, and does not utilize staff or family time.

    A few key highlights of information shared this year:

    • Everyone in our KSD Community has reason to celebrate the historical gains achieving an 83.7% graduation for the class of 2018. Graduation rates have risen for three consecutive years, up from 78.8% from the class of 2016, and reflects the exceptional work of our students and staff and the tremendous support of our families and community-based organizations. And while these gains represent the whole student body, specific student groups are not achieving at the same rate and we have much work still to do to ensure we are successfully preparing all students for their futures.
    • About 85% of our district expenditures are personnel-related. This is not dissimilar from the other 294 districts in Washington state. Last month (January 2019) our Budget and Finance team shared information to help our staff and community understand staffing and what has been occurring to restructure the KSD Budget to achieve long-term fiscal sustainability.

    The information reached a far larger and more diverse audience than our five in-person State of our District Community Conversation presentations in 2018 combined:

    KSD Website Response

    • 1,676 pageviews
    • 1,467 unique pageviews

    KSD Social Response

    • Each platform experienced growth, some platforms more than others.

     20. How did the 94 million levy over 2 years get spent?

    The Replacement Educational Programs and Operations Levy passed in February 2018 by our voters is a two-year replacement levy providing nearly 20 percent of the district’s overall budget. It funds approximately one in five of all employees and bridges the gap between state funding and community expectations. This levy provides support for athletics, music and drama programs, transportation services, and safety improvements.

    Student Support (Funds 1 in 5 of our employees)

    • Nurses: The state provides funding for 4.5 FTE (full time equivalent) and KSD employs a total of 22.4 FTE nurses to meet the individual health needs of the students and the needs of those students who need special care.
    • Safety and Security Personnel: The state provides funding for 5 FTE and KSD employs 14.23 FTE to meet the safety and security needs of our students and staff at our 42 school sites.
    • School counselors, social workers and school psychologists: The state provides funding for 57.9 FTE and KSD employs 28 school psychologists, 31 secondary and 13 elementary counselors along with 5 social workers.  Nearly 20 more FTE above the state allocation formula, to meet to meet the unique social emotional and counseling needs of our 27,000 students.

    Academic Programs & Classroom Supports

    • Certificated and classified staff for Special Education and Highly Capable programs
    • Paraeducators
    • Professional development for teachers including professional learning days, training, and workshops
    • Substitute teachers
    • Curriculum materials and training
    • Reduced class sizes

    Activities, Athletics & Enrichment

    • Advanced Placement (AP) Classes
    • International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program
    • All extracurricular activities
    • Sports
    • Athletic directors
    • Coaches

    Operations

    • Transportation
    • Substitute classified staff
    • Maintenance staff
    • Custodians

    Opportunities

    • High school schedules that create opportunities for acceleration, exploration, and remediation
    • Music programming at the elementary schools
    • Increased counselors and support
    • Expanded Early Learning programs

    Levy Funding

    Overall funding is $94 million total over two years:

    • 2019: $44 million
    • 2020: $50 million

May 11, 2019: King County Library Fairwood

  • About the Event

    The following questions were recorded by Ross Hardy and Denise Daniels at the May 11, 2019, Community Conversation with the School Board held at Kentwood High School.

    The Board worked with Team KSD for answers and made them available on May 22, 2019. 

    Questions

    1. The community would like a “class cut” decision statement from each HS and MS principal, ideally, all of them who had to make such cuts for the upcoming ’19-20 school year.

    Each Spring after enrollment projections have been reviewed, the student transfer window has closed, secondary school registrations have been submitted, and federal programming allocations have been received, preliminary allocations are sent to principals for review with human resources. The timeline of this process is in alignment with all KSD collective bargaining agreements.

    Based on the information outlined above, the allocations for 2019-20 school year reflected a total reduction of 26.6 positions across all four comprehensive high schools, 6.2 positions across the four middle schools and 40 positions across the 28 elementary schools.

    Compare school music courses and sections from 2018-2019 to 2019-20 across high schools and middle schools. 

    2. Would like to see reporting on the enrichment funds spent this year and planned for next year. Also would like an explanation of how the enrichment funds are being budgeted given the proposed cuts.

    The Replacement Educational Programs and Operations Levy passed in February 2018 by our voters is a two-year replacement levy providing nearly 20 percent of the district’s overall budget. It funds approximately one in five of all employees and bridges the gap between state funding and community expectations. This levy provides support for athletics, music and drama programs, transportation services, and safety improvements.

    Student Support (Funds 1 in 5 of our employees)

    • Nurses: The state provides funding for 4.5 FTE (full time equivalent) and KSD employs a total of 22.4 FTE nurses to meet the individual health needs of the students and the needs of those students who need special care.
    • Safety and Security Personnel: The state provides funding for 5 FTE and KSD employs 14.23 FTE to meet the safety and security needs of our students and staff at our 42 school sites.
    • School counselors, social workers and school psychologists: The state provides funding for 57.9 FTE and KSD employs 28 school psychologists, 31 secondary and 13 elementary counselors along with 5 social workers.  Nearly 20 more FTE above the state allocation formula, to meet to meet the unique social emotional and counseling needs of our 27,000 students.

    Academic Programs & Classroom Supports

    • Certificated and classified staff for Special Education and Highly Capable programs
    • Paraeducators
    • Professional development for teachers including professional learning days, training, and workshops
    • Substitute teachers
    • Curriculum materials and training
    • Reduced class sizes

    Activities, Athletics & Enrichment

    • Advanced Placement (AP) Classes
    • International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program
    • All extracurricular activities
    • Sports
    • Athletic directors
    • Coaches

    Operations

    • Transportation
    • Substitute classified staff
    • Maintenance staff
    • Custodians

    Opportunities

    • High school schedules that create opportunities for acceleration, exploration, and remediation
    • Music programming at the elementary schools
    • Increased counselors and support
    • Expanded Early Learning programs

    Levy Funding

    Overall funding is $94 million total over two years:

    • 2019: $44 million
    • 2020: $50 million

    3. What are the percent of kids impacted for elective choices because they have to pursue credit recovery during high school? 

    KSD cannot provide a “percent” as individual student schedules and credits deficient would need to be considered by the individual student. Even if the percentage of students not on pace to graduate is provided, each individual student's pathway to graduation is dependent on her/his credits already taken, needed, and student choice. 

    4. How can the District seek to resolve the conflict between locked doors as required by the Fire Marshall compared to offering 1:1 tutoring and not discouraging students from speaking with teachers because the door has to be closed? 

    KSD follows Fire Marshall regulations. Recommendations are also based on law enforcement partners’ annual review of safety regulations and best practices.  

    5. What is the current plan to get to the required 17:1 K-3 class size ratio? Does it involve additional portables and/or building capacity or in-room supports?   

    1:17 K-3 class size is determined at a districtwide level by dividing the total number of students in K-3 with the total K-3 teacher FTE. The teacher FTE that can be factored into that equation is dictated by WAC 392-140-932 and includes not only elementary classroom teachers in grades k-3, but also portions of FTE in pe, music, Special education, Hi-Cap, ELL, and others. Therefore, classrooms can expect to have more than 17 students when the districtwide 1:17 ratio is met. KSD is in the process of ensuring all qualifying teacher FTE has been factored and is reviewing the student enrollment projections to determine exactly how many teachers would need to be hired to meet the 1:17 ratio. 

Last Modified on May 24, 2019